Author: Graeme Johnston

  • Juralio rolling out across Slaughter and May

    Juralio rolling out across Slaughter and May

    Graeme Johnston / 3 February 2023 We’re pleased to announce that Slaughter and May have, since January 2023, started making Juralio available across the firm.  This follows Juralio winning the firm’s Collaborate competition in December 2020 and a pilot in 2021. The 2023 roll-out started with the firm’s London Corporate and Disputes groups and some Business Services […]

  • Information as power

    Information as power

    Graeme Johnston / 30 January 2023 Informating …[A]ctivities… are transformed into information and thus become visible and measurable… [This] can be empowering. However, it can also be used to centralize power… [to] enable… monitoring… and [to replace people] by machines. However, these machines create new forms of information that can be used, simultaneously creating new […]

  • Making progress with process in complex legal work

    Making progress with process in complex legal work

    Graeme Johnston / 24 January 2023 If you mention ‘process’ to many lawyers, it tends to conjure visions of something handed down from above. Potentially imposing burdens upon you for the benefit of others. Possibly managed by people who don’t really get the realities of legal work. It may in some contexts also have the […]

  • The price of everything (in the law)

    The price of everything (in the law)

    Graeme Johnston / 9 January 2023 After the Roman period, the first laws surviving in written form for part of what is now England are those of King Æthelberht of Kent, around 1400 years ago. As you can see from the image, they were much concerned with putting a price on unhappy occurrences. A simple system […]

  • Trees, imperfection and disorder

    Trees, imperfection and disorder

    Graeme Johnston / 30 December 2022 A perennial topic is whether to conceptualise work, organisations, documents, knowledge – and information generally – in The more flexible approaches have benefits which are so well-known that I won’t try to summarise them here. Trees also have serious limitations and dangers, also well-known. So. Nobody would claim that […]

  • Improving how legal stuff is addressed: ten old themes

    Improving how legal stuff is addressed: ten old themes

    Graeme Johnston / 27 December 2022 This is the first in a series of posts on how I think the ways legal topics are handled are likely, or unlikely, to change over the next decade or so. My focus will be on the UK, but some of the themes will be of broader relevance. Although there […]

  • Two types of transparency in legal work

    Two types of transparency in legal work

    Graeme Johnston / 23 October 2022 There has, for years now, been great talk of ‘transparency’ as a thing to aim for in legal work, though sometimes more instrumental words are used, like reporting, analytics and dashboards. The desire is, I think, typically to know: On the surface – what’s being done and, more pointedly, […]

  • Videos on complex work in teams

    Videos on complex work in teams

    Graeme Johnston / August 2022 I’ve recently been sharing some short videos on LinkedIn. Here’s a list for finding it easily. I’ll update this as I add more. Friday 5th August – experimental start: a poem about a mouse and what we’re doing at Juralio. Saturday 6th August – first video on complex work in […]

  • Juralio templates

    Juralio templates

    Graeme Johnston / 2 July 2022 The image shows a message I’ve just sent to Juralio early access participants seeking views on which templates to add next. 🟢 Juralio helps you to map your work and get it done. Project management and more. Simple and pleasant to use, and scales to complex stuff while still […]

  • Juralio early access June / July 2022

    Juralio early access June / July 2022

    Graeme Johnston / 22 June 2022 Some news. We’ve just gone live with an early access version of Juralio, our software to help you map your work and get it done. You can try it out on a free-of-charge basis until the end of July.* A short (27 second) video by my colleagues Molly Macgregor and James Friel is […]